Monthly Archives: November 2009

Human identity: what are people like in the afterlife? – 2

Ms Rex gave an adapted version of this talk to the IIIrd & IVth-form WP about what the great traditions, from Homer and the Old Testament, through Plato and into Christianity and Dante, have said about what of our selves survives after death. An episode of the Simpsons (“Heaven and Hell”) reinforced the ideas she was discussing.

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Jack and Azeem

Chigwell VIth form’s performance poets, Jack Stannard and Azeem Khan, performed for the two older WP branches: fast, rhythmic, and deadly seriously funny, these two then led a strong discussion on what made them write, how they wrote, and what they thought poetry was for: both had such different reasons for writing, yet both wrote through a necessity to tell the truth. And we saw a clip of Jack’s hero – John Cooper Clarke.

linguae novae!

Mr Lord and Mr Coppell got the IIIrd and IVth form WP to devise, in groups, a new language, or, rather, enough of a new language to translate the English “The yellow shepherd saved his master’s sheep from the yellow grandmother’s teeth. Hooray! Let’s party!”. They were asked to try and:

  • use sounds which weren’t part of English, e.g. clicks
  • think about how to express grammatical relationships in different ways
  • make their language sound interesting.

Mr Coppell has judged the attempts, and the winners will be announced in an assembly.

Human identity – what are people like in the afterlife – 1?

Ms Rex gave a full and fascinating talk to the Rem-UV and VIth-form branches of the WP about what the great traditions, from Homer and the Old Testament, through Plato and into Christianity and Dante, have said about what of our selves survives after death. She went on to discuss the contemporary theological debate between those who argue that the Old Testament presents a completely psychosomatic view of the soul-body (i.e. that the two are really one entity), and those who say that the soul and the body are separate. We went into the Hebrew of the Book of Job to assess these views.

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