Category Archives: Sports Science

Mr Wright – “Yes! Yes! Yes! How professional wrestling teaches us about life”

In this Williams Project, which was run by Mr Wright, we took a look at how professional wrestling teaches us about life and how every good wrestling match is like telling a story. The Williams Project was interesting, and Mr Wright showed us some of his favourite wrestlers of all time, including people like Hulk Hogan and Brock Lesnar. He even showed us some of the interviews he had with some professional wrestlers and he told us a story about him being a kid and wanting to get this action figure and it was out of stock. But in the end he had managed to meet the real wrestler and have an interview with him. I personally found this Williams Project quite different to the others and it was fun.

Hamza Choudhry

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Robert Colls: England and the Olympics – the History

Robert Colls, Professor of Cultural History at De Montfort University, gave a really clear talk on the origins of the modern Olympics. He showed how, despite their being founded by a Frenchman, his inspiration was largely from England. Shocked by France’s defeat by the Prussians (i.e. Germany) in 1871, Baron de Coubertin wanted to build the strength and manhood of the French youth. After reading Tom Brown’s Schooldays and visiting English public schools like Rugby, where sport was seen as an essential part of a character-building curriculum, he developed the idea of making the Olympics, which had been revived in Greece as part of that young nation’s quest for identity, truly international and amateur. He’d be surprised now by what the Olympic movement has become, but not too disappointed!

Mrs S. Bint and Mr B. Wille: Deviance in the Olympics, ancient and modern

Continuing, from Richard Barham’s talk, the Olympic theme, and reinforcing the PE department’s week of Olympic lessons, our own Mrs Bint and Mr Wille led a presentation and discussion on cheating in these most revered games. Interesting similarities emerged, from nationality switching (a Cretan competed for Ephesus; Zola Budd changed from South African to British), through familiar bribery to performance enhancing (Pelops’ winged horses, modern-day drugs), we realised that, when national pride and lots of money are at stake, not a lot has changed.

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